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It’s done! It’s been edited by me, tech edited, and test knit so I guess it’s time to let my pattern out into the world. It ended up being 12 pages long. I wanted to try to get it under 10 pages, but I would rather avoid “at the same time”s and “reverse shaping for left”s and take up a few extra pages on something this complicated. It’s definitely an intermediate to advanced knit. You can get the pattern on Ravelry here for $6.50 or buy it now.

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You can read more about the construction in detail in my older posts, but to sum it up, Agatha is a seamless top down sweater with lace panels and cuffed set in sleeves. The body is knit first in one piece and then the sleeves are picked up and worked using short rows. It uses Cascade 220 and 4.5mm needles and comes in seven sizes ranging from 29″-53″ busts. My sweater is the 37″ bust and is modeled with two or three inches of negative ease.

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What I really like talking about when I finish a pattern I’ve been blogging about is the pictures. These ones still amuse me. They look nice and fall-like with all of the colorful leaves, right? Well I took them in January in Lancaster. Those are flash frozen leaves. There were a few pictures that didn’t work out where you could see snow on the ground. I was very cold when I took these which is probably why I ended up with zero pictures where I’m smiling.

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I was also reading a lot of gothic literature for class at the time and I think that spilled over into the pictures a little bit. I like the sort of lost-in-the-woods vibe I ended up with, but I’m not sure how well that will work for selling a pattern. Most pattern photos have smiley models.

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Anyways, thank you for all of the supportive comments I’ve received through out this process and thank you to my test knitters and tech editor. This was a huge project for me and I really appreciated how encouraging everyone was. Thank you.

And for the record, this pattern is named after Agatha Christie.

29 Comments

  • First, the sweater is *gorgeous*. Second, the photography is perfect. Even before I read your description of the photo shoot, I thought the photos were telling me a story — loved it!

  • I’m so happy that it is finally out. And I’m with you. I’d rather have more pattern pages and fewer “interpretive” bits.
    I’ve been rather nervous about using a tech editor on my own knits. (Like who to go to, what to ask, price) Do you have any advice?

  • Yippee! I know you are going to do sooo well with this! I love your pictures too, you really know how to rock the remote controlled pics. I always look ridiculous when I take them of myself.

  • Wow, I wouldn’t worry about the pictures – for one, they’re gorgeous, and for another, that pattern sells itself! It’s beautiful, plus top-down and seamless? Yes, please!

  • Eventually other people will knit this (like, say, me), and they’ll be overjoyed with it and take smiley pictures. So then when other people do Rav searches for it you’ll have your smiles anyway 😉

  • I love this!! I also love that you’re not smiling in the photos. I always think that sometimes the models look crazy for smiling while traipsing about during an obviously cold day. Then again, I like to make snap judgements based on zero evidence when it comes to models.

  • I actually disagree. The sadder looking the model, the more I want to buy the pattern. It’s an odd thing but look at the Quince pattern photos and the Rowan patterns.

  • Gorgeous! Gorgeous!! I certainly intend to buy the pattern. I love my Miette to death so, as far as I’m concerned, purchasing Agatha is getting 2 for the price of one.

  • Gorgeous construction.
    Question: how much yardage of yarn do you estimate I could save if I switched to elbow length sleeves?
    thanks for insight.

    • I’m sorry to disappoint! I don’t know how closely you’ve read Pinterest’s TOS, but they give Pinterest the right to do whatever they want with images that are pinned, and I am not comfortable with that. Pinning images that don’t belong to you both violates the creator’s copyrights and Pinterest’s TOS. If you’d like to remember the pattern, you can always use traditional bookmarking methods that don’t involve giving away my rights to Cold Brew Labs, or you can add it to your queue on Ravelry.

  • I just wanted to thank you for the time you put into this pattern! As I can be quite air-headed, I appreciate that you didn’t resort to any “reverse shaping for left”s. You have the most adorable style, and I’ve been on the hunt for the perfect cropped cardigan for my dresses and skirts and this one definitely fits the bill.

    (P.S. To be honest, I think the final selling point for me was that you named this one after Agatha Christie.)

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